Ten (10) ARIA Best Practices

The assistive technologies such as screen readers and speech recognition applications rely on HTML semantics of the page to convey the information such as heading, button, link, etc. The assistive technologies such as screen readers also use these semantic information to provide options to the users to quickly navigate in an application with special quick navigation keys apart from tab and arrow keys.

ARIA (Accessible Rich Internet Applications) is a specification from W3C which enables to provide the semantic information to the assistive technologies in custom built applications. It is very important to use the ARIA in a right way else it will not convey the intended information to the users.

This post will discuss 10 (ten) and basic best practices of using ARIA attributes in an application. These best practices have been identified by analysing various ARIA related accessibility issues found in various custom elements.

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Building an Accessible Button with Anchor Tag

Ideally it is good to reserve anchor <a> tag only for links and use <button> or <input type=”button”> tags for buttons from the accessibility and usability point of view. However, for various reasons we build custom buttons with <a>, <div> or <span>. The five (5) important things to be taken care to ensure that the button is accessible (ADA compliant) are discussed in this post. Ensure there is an appropriate keydown function along with the things discussed in this article.

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